Active Travel - Monlife

Abergavenny Active Travel scheme, Bridge connection to Llanfoist

Proposals overview

Have your Say

Thank you for visiting this page. Monmouthshire County Council (MCC) and its local partners are seeking your views on the proposed Active Travel links between the proposed Llanfoist Foot and Cycle Bridge across the River Usk and Llanfoist to the south. The scheme will tie into work being undertaken in relation to the provision of the proposed Llanfoist Foot and Cycle Bridge and the proposed improvements within Castle Meadows. More specifically, the scheme proposes to:

  • Provide a safe and appropriate Active Travel route for pedestrians, cyclists and those with impaired mobility, between the proposed Llanfoist Foot and Cycle Bridge across the River Usk and Llanfoist to the south (and vice-versa).
  • Make sustainable transport choices more attractive, thus reducing emphasis on private car use.
  • Improve highway crossing facilities for pedestrians, cyclists, and those with mobility impairment, within Llanfoist.

The extent of the scheme can be seen in Figure 1.

Why are improvements needed?

Abergavenny is one of the key strategic sites not only in Monmouthshire but for the County’s bordering towns. It acts as the main retail, educational, and cultural centre for an extensive rural area, extending into the old Greater Gwent authority areas and Herefordshire.

Abergavenny, situated in the north of Monmouthshire, acts as a retail, educational and cultural hub for an extensive rural area, extending into the old Greater Gwent authority areas and Herefordshire.

The A4143 Merthyr Road connects the two communities of Abergavenny and Llanfoist via the existing Llanfoist Bridge, which crosses over the River Usk.   Castle Meadows and Ysbytty Fields are important leisure areas for the community and are crossed by Public Rights of Way (PRoW) and National Cycle Network (NCN) Routes 42 and 46.

To date, study findings suggest that many people who would otherwise walk or cycle between Llanfoist and Abergavenny are deterred solely by the poor pedestrian and cycling facilities. Those with impaired mobility are particularly disadvantaged by the current facilities.

Key issues relevant to the scheme’s area have been identified during the early stages of the study and are summarised below:

  • The existing road network in the area is extremely busy, making the environment unappealing for pedestrians, cyclists, and those with mobility impairments.  Analysis of 2011 Census data identified that 15% of drivers in the area travel less than 2km and 8% between 2km and 5km.  Some of these trips could be accommodated by Active Travel modes if adequate Non Motorised User infrastructure would be provided.
  • There is currently no off-road cycle facilities, as such cyclists have to use the existing carriageway/s to travel.
  • There is a lack of adequate crossing facilities at the “Waitrose” roundabout.
  • At sections of the scheme, footways are narrow and sub-standard, forcing pedestrians into close proximity to the carriageway and traffic.
  • There are significant perceived road safety issues, particularly along Merthyr Road between the Bridge Inn pub and ‘Waitrose’ roundabout.
  • The Cutting is recognised as a quiet-way, and as such, has the potential to accommodate more cyclists’ movement.
  • The current route behind Waitrose Petrol Station is narrow and overgrown.

Objectives of the Scheme

The scheme’s objectives have been derived by identifying key issues (as summarised above) and according to the objectives set by the MCC and Welsh Government (WG) transport policies. The objectives are as follows:

  • Improve access to local services, employment, and cultural facilities by Active Travel modes by improving connectivity between Abergavenny and Llanfoist.
  • Promote and facilitate healthier lifestyles by increasing the number of pedestrians and cyclists using Merthyr Road and The Cutting for commuting purposes.
  • Make a positive contribution to air quality by promoting active travel in MCC and supporting the reduction of Carbon Dioxide around the Abergavenny / Llanfoist area.
  • Introduce safe and accessible active travel links and remove conflicts between users around the ‘Waitrose’ Roundabout.
  • Provide a coherent, direct, and future-proof cycle route which connects with the existing and planned active travel infrastructure.

The scheme proposals are anticipated to encourage the public to adopt walking and cycling as preferred modes of travel. Also, it is considered the scheme may help benefit the local environment by reducing carbon emissions. 

Scheme Proposals

Overview

The scheme proposes:

  • The widening of the existing footway along the eastern side of Merthyr Road between the Bridge Inn pub and ‘Waitrose’ Roundabout, to accommodate a 3.5m wide shared (pedestrian and cycle) route. To accommodate this proposal, on-street parking at this location will be removed.
  • The provision of new crossing facilities across three arms of Merthyr Road.
  • The widening of the existing footway along the eastern side of Merthyr Road between Waitrose Roundabout and the Heads of Valleys Slip Road / Merthyr Road Roundabout to the south to accommodate a 3.5m wide shared (pedestrian and cycle) route. 
  • The widening of the existing footway along the eastern side of Merthyr Road between the Heads of Valleys Slip Road / Merthyr Road Roundabout and Gypsy Lane, to accommodate a 3.5m wide shared (pedestrian and cycle) route. 
  • The provision of improved more direct crossing points across Coopers Way and the eastern and western arms of the Heads of Valleys Slip Road / Merthyr Road Roundabout.
  • The widening of the existing footway along the back edge of the car park located to the immediate north of ‘Waitrose’ Roundabout, to accommodate a 3.5m wide shared (pedestrian and cycle) route.   This will involve a slight relocation of the existing car parking southwards (with the loss of one space) and the provision of two spaces to the western side of Merthyr Road adjacent to Kwik Fit (leading to an overall net gain of one space).
  • The widening of the existing footway along the back of Waitrose Petrol Station between ‘Waitrose Roundabout’ and The Cutting Heads of the Valleys Road underpass, to accommodate a 3.5m wide shared (pedestrian and cycle) route. 
  • The promotion (through additional signage and road markings) of The Cutting (without impacting the existing access and parking arrangements) between The Cutting Heads of the Valleys Road underpass and Merthyr Road to the south as a quiet-way for pedestrians, cyclists and those with mobility impairment.
  • The improvement of the existing The Cutting and Merthyr Road priority junction arrangement.

Merthyr Road

As detailed above, it is proposed to upgrade the existing footway along the eastern side of Merthyr Road between The Bridge Inn pub and Gypsy Lane to accommodate a 3.5m shared route, which would be suitable for pedestrians, cyclists, and those with mobility impairment to use.

This will be achieved by widening the existing footways into the existing carriageway.   To accommodate this, there will be a need to remove the existing on-street car parking along the eastern side of Merthyr Road between the Bridge Inn pub and the ‘Waitrose’ Roundabout.   There will also be a need to remove the existing bus layby, located between ‘Waitrose’ roundabout and Coopers Way on the eastern side of Merthyr Road, and re-provide the bus stop in the same location but instead on carriageway. 

It is proposed to upgrade the existing uncontrolled crossing points on the southern, northern, and western arms of ‘Waitrose’ Roundabout to zebra crossings.   

To accommodate the wider route to the rear of the car park located to the immediate north of the ‘Waitrose’ Roundabout, it is proposed that the existing car parking be relocated southwards.  This will result in the loss of one space; however this will be re-provided as part of the two spaces being proposed on the western side of Merthyr Road adjacent to Kwik Fit (leading to an overall net gain of one space).

At Coopers Way it is proposed to provide a Toucan crossing, which will enable a more direct connection for future users over the current arrangement.

At the Heads of Valleys Slip Road / Merthyr Road Roundabout, it is proposed to replace the existing signal controlled crossing located on the eastern of the roundabout with a zebra crossing.   This will be located closer to the roundabout to provide a more direct connections for future users over the current arrangement.

Whilst it does not form part of the proposed shared route along the eastern side of Merthyr Road, to aid future pedestrian connectivity, it is also proposed to upgrade the existing uncontrolled crossing points on the western arm of the Heads of Valleys Slip Road / Merthyr Road Roundabout to a zebra crossing.

The above proposals are illustrated in Figures 2 and 3 below.

Figure 2: Proposals along Merthyr Road

Figure 3: Proposals along Merthyr Road

The Cutting

As detailed above, it is proposed to widen the existing footway along the back of Waitrose Petrol Station between ‘Waitrose Roundabout’ and The Cutting Heads of the Valleys Road underpass, to accommodate a 3.5m wide shared (pedestrian and cycle) route.  This is not anticipated to impact on the existing vegetation along the route. 

It is also proposed to promote (through additional signage and road markings) The Cutting (without impacting the existing access and parking arrangements) between The Cutting Heads of the Valleys Road underpass and Merthyr Road to the south as a quite-way for pedestrians, cyclists and those with mobility impairment.

To aid with access at the southern end of The Cutting, it’s proposed to improve, by tightening existing radii’s, the existing priority junction arrangement with Merthyr Road.  This will involve formalising the existing parking located on the western side of the junction, in front of properties 1-4 The Cutting.

The above proposals are illustrated onin Figures 4 and 5 below.

Figure 4: Proposals along The Cutting

Figure 5: Proposals along The Cutting

Your Opinion

Your opinion on the proposals matters to us.  As such, we ask that you please complete the survey at the below link and include your postcode.

The survey asks some general questions about the way you normally travel in the study area before asking about your experiences in travelling between the existing Llanfoist Bridge and Llanfoist. The survey then asks you to rate the proposals as set out above.

Please encourage members of your household and others to undertake the survey since your responses may not necessarily reflect the views of others.

Take part in the Llanfoist active travel survey.


Caldicot Active Travel Links and Multi-User Route – Q&A

The Caldicot Links active travel scheme is designed to create an integrated network of shared use routes, linking existing and planned residential areas around east Caldicot to local destinations and public transport. The aim is to enable residents to use active travel for local trips and to connect to the wider Severnside active travel and public transport networks, through the construction of high quality and accessible routes for walking, wheeling and cycling.

Caldicot Active Travel Links scheme

Caldicot Links scheme focuses on the north and east of Caldicot. The scheme is broken down in to three different sections* (see plan below):

  • Phase 1: Running along the route of the old ex-Ministry of Defence Dinham railway line, from just south of the Cornfield at Portskewett, to level with Caldicot Castle Country Park.
  • Phases 2 & 3: From level with the country park northwards to Crick, crossing the northeast Caldicot development sites which are shown below in brown. The indicated development sites include areas that will be kept as green spaces and will not be built up.
  • Phase 4, the Multi-User Route: Running through the Country Park connecting Church Road to the west with Phases 1, 2 and 3 and Caldicot Road to the east.

*Sections of the scheme are being brought forward as funding and other constraints permit, i.e. not necessarily in numerical order.

Phase 1: The 1km long section along the old railway is currently in construction with contractors Horan Construction Limited. This work, is due to be completed in June 2024, finishing with the reinstatement of the temporary construction compound in Caldicot Castle Country Park.

During construction this section of the old railway line will need to be closed to the public for health and safety reasons and will include a temporary closure of the narrow footpath at the south-western end that links through to the industrial estate (Public Right of Way numbered 354/12/1 (part), 354/13/1, 376/10/7, 376/10/6 (part)).

In preparation for construction, vegetation clearance works have already been undertaken during an ecological window to clear areas for three access ramps and the main route. Additionally, many ash trees were felled as they had been identified as posing a risk to path users and to the existing highway bridges, largely due to infection with ash dieback disease, which left the trees at considerable risk of structural failure. An extensive compensatory replanting scheme of native trees and shrubs will be implemented once all the construction works are completed, to provide biodiversity net benefit and lead to a more resilient tree canopy along the route for the future.

At the beginning of December, a community litter pick was held along this section of the Links, when 17 volunteers helped to fill 50 rubbish sacks and create several piles of larger rubbish with items discarded over several decades.

Phases 2 & 3: MCC appointed contractors, Atkins Réalis, are undertaking a study of the options available for developing the route north and east of the Country Park, considering all the opportunities and the constraints of this area.

Phase 4 – Multi-User Route: MCC appointed consultants, Sustrans, have been undertaking a Route Options Review with key stakeholders following initial feedback on route proposals through the country park. Once this is complete, MCC will be ready to start the full design and permission process for the preferred route over the coming year.

Why focus on north and east Caldicot?

This scheme looks to improve sustainable access to services, shops, and sites of education and employment around Caldicot. Trip generation related to the planned residential development to the east and north of Caldicot, as well as the need to mitigate congestion related to local employment sites and the newly toll-free Severn bridges gives extra impetus to the scheme, as this is an opportunity to make active travel the preferred mode for local trips for old and new residents alike.

The phased Caldicot Links scheme focuses on the east of Caldicot, including linking to housing developments off Church Road and Crick Road, to ensure that current and future residents have accessible, healthy and sustainable transport options, to minimise and manage the road traffic impact of a growing population and to direct residents and visitors into the town centre as a local destination.

Below is a detail of our Active Travel Map for Caldicot, showing the time it would typically take to travel in the local area. The local development areas, shown in brown, will include parcels of green space (i.e. the indicated sites include areas that will not be built up):

What is active travel?

Active travel is a term used to describe walking, wheeling or cycling to a destination, which the Active Travel Act (Wales) 2013 calls “purposeful journeys”. It does not cover trips taken purely for leisure although it could significantly enhance leisure activities by helping to link up networks. Active travel can be used to get to school, work, services and shops, or as one of several modes on a longer journey – for example, walking to the station to catch a bus or train. Monmouthshire County Council (MCC)’s active travel strategy focuses on journeys of three miles or less, which means improving walking and cycling infrastructure within communities and between close-by settlements such as Caldicot, Portskewett and Crick, so that active travel can be the natural choice for local journeys. MCC also aims to improve active travel links to public transport, to support sustainable travel across the county.

How is the Caldicot Links scheme funded?

The Caldicot Active Travel links and Multi-user route will be funded through Welsh Government grants aimed at improvements to sustainable transport modes.

How will the removal of trees along active travel path route be mitigated?

In the construction of Phase 1, trees and greenery has been cleared to make way for the path and its access ramps. The amount of clearance is only that which is required to ensure the old railway line is safe for current users and to enable the construction of the Active Travel route while safeguarding wildlife on site. Once construction is complete, compensation planting of native trees and shrubs will introduce a more varied and resilient tree canopy bringing a net benefit for local biodiversity after the intervention.

The improved active travel routes are expected to increase local walking, wheeling and cycling opportunities, which should have a long-term positive impact on the environment and local biodiversity as described by Welsh Government’s Active Travel Act Guidance.

Why can’t cyclists use the road?

Many short car trips could be made by active travel instead. Perceived danger from road traffic is a key barrier preventing more people taking up active travel, and low levels of cycling despite the comprehensive road network demonstrate that cycling in the road is not a practical option for many. This scheme takes the opportunity to improve the accessibility of off-road routes which are more likely to offer an attractive and safe alternative to driving for a broader range of people, building the appetite for active travel whilst cutting the number of short trips made by car.

Contact us

If you would like to contact the project team, please email ActiveTravel@monmouthshire.go


Work progresses on Williams Field Lane to Monnow Bridge Active Travel Route

Starting from 22nd January, Monmouthshire County Council will begin work on a new active travel route, the Williams Field Lane to Monnow Bridge Active Travel Route. 

This project is funded by the Welsh Government Active Travel Fund and Core Active Allocation Fund, and it aims to develop a brand-new active travel route in Monmouth.

This route is a crucial part of the comprehensive Active Travel network. It will provide direct access to Monnow Bridge and the services and facilities within the town centre. The path will connect Williams Field Lane to Monmouth town centre via Wonastow Road and Drybridge Street. It will also provide connections from Rockfield Road skatepark to the town centre.

The work being undertaken will see a number of changes along the route. They include:

  • Widening the existing footway on the northern side of Wonastow Road to accommodate a shared-use footway/cycleway (two lanes for traffic will be maintained).
  • Replacing the existing Wonastow Road/Rockfield mini-roundabout with a priority junction (T-junction).
  • Providing a pedestrian crossing on Wonastow Road and Rockfield Road.
  • Widening the existing footway on Rockfield Road from the new priority junction to Monmouth skatepark. Two-way traffic will be maintained, and bus stops will be unaffected.
  • Widening of a short section of the existing footway along Drybridge Street near the Monnow Bridge roundabout
  • Removing sections of on-street parking along Wonastow Road to deliver the route in line with the Active Travel Act Guidance.

The work is expected to last for 12 weeks, with an aim to finish by mid-April 2024. This route will provide links to education settings, such as Overmonnow Primary and Monmouth Comprehensive, and be a pivotal link to the town centre and its facilities. The works will require temporary traffic light controls and have been arranged, taking into account other planned roadworks in the area to minimise impact.

If you want to find details of the complete program of work in Monmouth, please visit https://www.monlife.co.uk/williams-field-lane-to-monnow-bridge-active-travel-route/.

Monmouthshire County Council’s Cabinet Member for Climate Change and the Environment, Cllr Catrin Maby, said: “This is an exciting step in the progress of an Active Travel Route in Monmouth. The widening of footways will provide a safer route for cyclists and walkers as they travel around Monmouth.”


B4245 Rogiet to Undy active travel scheme – FAQ

The Rogiet to Undy B4245 active travel scheme aims to improve journeys between Rogiet and Undy. Several route options have been examined and, whilst additional routes may be developed in the future, a proposed primary route consisting of a shared use active travel path adjacent to the southern side of the B4245 has been assessed to provide the shortest, most direct active travel route between Rogiet and Undy. Detailed designs of this preferred option have been prepared for public consultation.

The red box on this image shows the section of the B4245 between Rogiet and Undy that is the subject of this scheme

Scheme description

The current B4245 between Undy and Rogiet has no pavement provision. Previous studies along this route have highlighted the need for safe pedestrian and cycle provision, to link into Severn Tunnel Junction railway station and across the Severnside area.

Rogiet and Undy are just over a mile apart, a distance that could be covered using a mobility scooter in half an hour or cycled in less than ten minutes. An active travel route along this section of the B4245 will allow residents of both villages to benefit from the facilities and opportunities offered by their neighbouring villages, without needing access to a car.

Consultation results

219 people examined the proposals and responded to our consultation, either at the in-person event on October 4th 2023 or online. Rogiet Community Council and Magor Town Council submitted comments separately.

B4245 Rogiet-Undy active travel path (Phase 1)

96% of people consulted were ‘very-‘ or ‘quite supportive’ of the proposed Rogiet to Undy active travel path, which is as expected given that there is currently no direct, accessible link for active travel. Many urgently want to have the option of active travel and find existing provision inadequate. The vast majority said the proposed improvements would influence their modal choice for local trips.

Comments focused on the potential for the proposed active travel path to be a safe, accessible, practical, sustainable, healthy, and affordable option. It is seen as a much-needed link ‘for all’ between communities. There was concern from some about the proximity of the path to the B4245, the potential for conflict between path users, the path’s impact on local biodiversity and the possibility of traffic congestion or loss of road width. We will address these concerns through design, applying best practice and analysis of impact to the local setting. Please see the FAQ’s section below for further details.

This route is seen as a step in connecting Magor and Undy to Severn Tunnel Junction, Caldicot and further afield. A typical comment said: ‘This is a plan that will benefit the residents and visitors of the related areas, and promoting more environmentally friendly travel modes, e.g., combined of walking/cycling and train instead of driving.’

Station Road (Phase 2)

Over half of people consulted travel along Station Road to get to public transport (Severn Tunnel Junction railway station) and the majority frequently use the route for purposeful journeys. Most said that wider pavements and general improvements to the active travel infrastructure would encourage them to walk and/or cycle along Station Road, where currently more than three quarters of people consulted mainly drive along it.

Rogiet to Caldicot proposed AT route (Phase 3)

92% of respondents said ‘Yes’ to the question ‘Would you support Phase 3 Rogiet to Caldicot Active Travel route section?’

What is active travel? 

Active Travel is a term used to describe walking, wheeling or cycling to a destination (also called “purposeful journeys”). It does not cover walking and cycling done purely for leisure although it could significantly enhance leisure activities by helping to link up networks. Active travel can be used to get to school, work, services and shops, or as one of several modes on a longer journey – for example, walking to the station to catch a bus or train. Monmouthshire County Council’s active travel strategy focuses on journeys of three miles or less, which means improving walking and cycling infrastructure within communities and between close-by villages such as Rogiet and Undy, to make active travel the first natural choice for local journeys.

Why focus on the B4245 between Rogiet and Undy?

The need for improvements in this part of Monmouthshire was highlighted during Monmouthshire County Council’s Integrated Network Map submission to the Welsh Government in 2018. The existing options for active travel between Rogiet and Undy (approximately 1,700 and 4,000 inhabitants, respectively) are limited and inaccessible to various users, due to high traffic speeds and volume, and a lack of barrier-free and safe paths. 

Several options for an active travel link between Rogiet and Undy have been examined and a proposed primary route consisting of a shared use active travel path adjacent to the southern side of the B4245 has been assessed to provide the shortest, most direct option.

The proposed route between Rogiet and Undy is an important link in the wider walking and cycling network. A short and direct active travel route will open up healthy, affordable and sustainable access to services, schools and job opportunities in the two villages, as well as connecting local people and visitors to the existing foot- and cycleways in the Severnside area, bus services along the B4245 and rail services to further afield.  

Levels of active travel are lower in Rogiet and Undy compared to Monmouthshire as a whole. At the same time, the proportion of residents in the local area who drive a car or van is higher than Monmouthshire as a whole (Census 2021). The 2021 Census also indicated that Magor and Rogiet has a high proportion (63.7%) of working-age residents who are likely to travel regularly to commute and therefore would directly benefit from improved access to Caldicot and Severn Tunnel Junction Railway Station.

The Proposals 

A study of potential options for active travel improvements in the area concluded that a three-metre wide, shared-use path to the southern side of the B4245 between Rogiet and Undy is the preferred option. Projects such as this one are usually progressed over several years from concept through to detailed design, following the Welsh Transport Appraisal Guidance or WelTAG (see below). Projects are then dependent on the approval of funding from bodies such as Welsh Government for the construction phase. We are currently at the detailed design stage of the process (WelTAG Stage 3). 

As the preferred route is to be for active travel, the process has been based on the Welsh Government’s Active Travel Act Guidance that was published in July 2021. This includes the application of walking and cycling audit tools as well as standards that active travel routes should adhere to. 

Option sifting 

At the start of this project and in line with the Welsh Transport Appraisal process the project team developed a wide list of possible solutions, sufficient to be able to decide whether there are any scheme options worth pursuing and to select a short list of options for more detailed consideration. Options were shortlisted based on: 

  • their ability to prevent, or solve the problem now and in the future; 
  • their ability to meet the objectives set and improve the social, cultural, environmental and economic well-being of Wales; 
  • their short- and longer-term impacts to deliver multiple benefits across the four aspects of well-being and maximise contribution to all seven well-being goals; 
  • their deliverability; and 
  • their robustness to uncertainty and potential to drive long lasting change. 

WelTAG Process 

The proposed scheme will seek approval and funding from the Welsh Government’s Active Travel Fund and has therefore been developed in line with the Welsh Transport Appraisal Guidance (WelTAG). The WelTAG process covers the complete lifecycle of a proposed intervention in the transport system from assessment of the problem, consideration of possible solutions and scheme design, through to implementation and project evaluation.

WelTAG studies are an essential part of major transport projects in Wales to help decide which are the most appropriate solutions to develop, and important in the support of bids to Welsh Government for funding grants to complete the works. WelTAG involves a series of project planning stages that follow the life of a project, programme or policy from early ideas to after it is completed. There are five WelTAG stages: Stages 1 and 2 of the project were completed in August 2022, and we are currently at WelTAG Stage 3.

Future phases 

The Rogiet to Undy route (phase 1, shown here as a green line) will complement other Severnside area proposed active travel improvements that Monmouthshire County Council are currently investigating as phases 2 and 3 of this project (red line and blue line, respectively). Phase 2 will focus of developing active travel improvements along Station Road in Rogiet to encourage walking and cycling journeys to Seven Tunnel Junction train station. Phase 3 will progress proposals to continue this route from the train station travelling east, to Caldicot, with the potential to link to National Cycle Network route (NCN) 4 at Station Road in Caldicot.

FAQ

When will the route be constructed? 

The successful completion of the WelTAG Stage 3, providing a full business case including detailed designs and delivery information, will allow us to apply for funding to move to WelTAG Stage 4 (construction phase). Monmouthshire County Council could request funding to progress this scheme as early as next financial year (2024/2025), dependent upon progress of designs and securing permissions. 

How will the scheme be funded? 

The route will be funded through Welsh Government grants aimed at improvements to sustainable transport modes. 

Why is the route on the south side of the road? 

The settlements of Undy and Rogiet are both predominantly on the south side of the B4245, this alignment of the route will reduce the number of road crossings required, improving the route coherence. In addition, an active travel route is better accommodated on the south side of the M4 underpass due to the cattle pass on the north side of the road.

Why is the route alongside the road? 

Alternative route alignments were considered in the provisional studies for the route, these were discounted due to either public opinion or technical feasibility. The route alongside the road was seen to be a positive for personal safety due to the visible security of others passing. 

The B4245 is a busy road, and a buffer will be provided where possible between this shared use route and the carriageway. This follows the design principles set out in the Active Travel Design Guidance: https://www.gov.wales/sites/default/files/publications/2022-01/active-travel-act-guidance.pdf  

Why can’t cyclists use the road or the NCN route?

This scheme aims to make it possible for a wider range of people to comfortably and safely reach local destinations using active travel. While cycling (as opposed to walking) makes up a higher percentage of active travel around Rogiet and Undy, overall active travel levels are low in the area.

The National Cycle Network section (NCN4) that joins Undy and Rogiet is an indirect route that is largely unlit and unsealed, making it either impractical or unsuitable for a diversity of people to use active travel between Rogiet and Undy.

The proposed shared use active travel path alongside the B4245, a wide single surface, would accommodate a wider range of active travel modes. The path is designed for use by pedestrians and people using wheelchairs and mobility scooters, as well as those on bikes and larger/adaptive cycles. Though some people currently cycle on this section of the B4245, the speed and volume of traffic – as well as the presence of heavy goods vehicles – makes it unlikely that most people will choose to cover this short, direct route by active travel unless a separated path is provided.

What is a ‘shared use active travel path’?

A shared use path is a path for use by any mode of active travel, be it walking, wheeling or cycling, without any physical separating features or markings. Cars and motorbikes are not permitted on a shared use path. The proposed shared use path is designed as three metres wide, with the exception of the section of the M4 overbridge where slight narrowing may be necessary. The route will be lit and separated from the road traffic.

Shared use paths are recommended in the Active Travel Act guidance for inter-urban roads such as the B4245 between Rogiet and Undy, where the number of users of different modes is unlikely to reach a level where separate provision – and the consequent environmental, land, materials and cost impact – would be justified. Routes with a wide single surface are better able to accommodate larger cycles, such as those used by disabled people, and people in wheelchairs. Shared use paths allow for flexible use depending on the time of day – for example, cyclists may be the majority group during the weekday peak, and pedestrians and those using mobility scooters during daytimes and at the weekend.

Shared use routes are designed to provide sufficient space so that cyclists can comfortably overtake groups of pedestrians and slower cyclists, in accordance with Active Travel Act guidance. Illegal use of active travel paths by people on motorbikes and e-scooters is a police matter and should be duly reported by calling 111.

How does this affect plans for a Magor & Undy Walkway station?

Monmouthshire County Council is supportive of plans for Magor and Undy Walkway Station as it will encourage and support active travel, help the modal switch from road to rail and lead to a reduction in carbon emissions and air pollution in the area. The meantime addition of an active travel route between Undy and Rogiet complements plans for a walkway station, offering the option of car-free trips and embedding the choice of active travel and sustainable transport in local people’s travel habits.

Is there enough space, will greenery be removed and will the road be narrowed?

The proposed active travel route will require the redesign of parts of the road and verge, and the acquisition of slivers of land from private landowners. The current road width varies along this portion, the scheme will make the road a consistent width of six and a half metres, which is the current minimum width of the road.

Monmouthshire County Council’s land team will engage with the landowners if approval for the scheme allows progress to this stage. The relevant landowners have already been contacted by the ecology team who required permission to enter private land to carry out ecology surveys in preparation for this scheme.

Where necessary, verges, hedges and field boundaries will be re-designed, along with field accesses and walls. The redesign includes the translocation or replacement planting of hedges and trees. Ensuring that the scheme brings a net benefit to biodiversity is fundamental of Monmouthshire County Council and a requirement for Welsh Government funding of the scheme.  The scheme will be appropriately assessed for ecological constraints and opportunities as part of the active travel project. Monmouthshire County Council’s Green Infrastructure team will work closely with the project team to ensure that impacts are minimised and opportunities are maximised to contribute towards nature recovery.

Contact us

If you would like to contact the project team, please email ActiveTravel@monmouthshire.gov.uk  

Useful links

New draft Welsh Transport Appraisal Guidance (not yet adopted)

https://www.gov.wales/welsh-transport-appraisal-guidance-weltag-2022

Welsh Transport Appraisal Guidance 2017

https://www.gov.wales/sites/default/files/publications/2017-12/welsh-transport-appraisal-guidance.pdf

Active Travel Design guidance

https://www.gov.wales/sites/default/files/publications/2022-01/active-travel-act-guidance.pdf

Llwybr Newydd – The Wales Transport Strategy 2021

https://www.gov.wales/sites/default/files/publications/2021-03/llwybr-newydd-wales-transport-strategy-2021-full-strategy_0.pdf

Monmouthshire Community and Corporate Plan

Community and Corporate Plan – Version 3.0_Council.pdf (monmouthshire.gov.uk)


Williams Field Lane to Monnow Bridge Active Travel Route

March 2024 Update

Work began on Drybridge street in early February, however, the scheme was set back immediately as contractors broke through an unmapped Welsh Water mains water pipe. This was due to having been laid too shallow to meet the usual required standards. The entire scheme had to be paused whilst Welsh Water came in to make the necessary inspections and repairs to the water main and a nearby culvert. Some re-design work has also had to be carried out to the footways to avoid further obstacles that had presented themselves with the initial works.

Some work has progressed on different sections of the scheme, with the widening of the footway between the skate park entrance and the junction at Drybridge House almost complete. Whilst the scheme has fallen behind schedule these limited works have enabled the scheme to continue. The original completion date of around mid-April will unfortunately not be possible and so a revised completion date is now set for the middle of May 2024.

Works to still be completed are:

  • Installation of a crossing point from Drybridge House across Rockfield Road to the new footway by the skate park
  • Replacing the existing mini roundabout with a priority crossing “T” junction
  • Widening of the footway on the northern side of Wonastow Road to link up with the Williams Field Lane path
  • Widening a short section of the Drybridge Street near to the Monnow Bridge roundabout.

Subject to several enquiries and some confusion we would like to confirm that there will not be permanent traffic lights installed as part of the final scheme. The traffic lights there currently are only temporary whilst the works are ongoing and will be removed once the scheme construction has been completed.

This route provides a vital connection as part of our overall active travel network in Monmouth and continues to provide the infrastructure to enable residents to make a movement towards more sustainable modes of transport.

Work progresses on Williams Field Lane to Monnow Bridge Active Travel Route

Starting from 22nd January, Monmouthshire County Council will begin work on a new active travel route, the Williams Field Lane to Monnow Bridge Active Travel Route. 

This project is funded by the Welsh Government Active Travel Fund and Core Active Allocation Fund, and it aims to develop a brand-new active travel route in Monmouth.

This route is a crucial part of the comprehensive Active Travel network. It will provide direct access to Monnow Bridge and the services and facilities within the town centre. The path will connect Williams Field Lane to Monmouth town centre via Wonastow Road and Drybridge Street. It will also provide connections from Rockfield Road skatepark to the town centre.

The work being undertaken will see a number of changes along the route. They include:

  • Widening the existing footway on the northern side of Wonastow Road to accommodate a shared-use footway/cycleway (two lanes for traffic will be maintained).
  • Replacing the existing Wonastow Road/Rockfield mini-roundabout with a priority junction (T-junction).
  • Providing a pedestrian crossing on Wonastow Road and Rockfield Road.
  • Widening the existing footway on Rockfield Road from the new priority junction to Monmouth skatepark. Two-way traffic will be maintained, and bus stops will be unaffected.
  • Widening of a short section of the existing footway along Drybridge Street near the Monnow Bridge roundabout
  • Removing sections of on-street parking along Wonastow Road to deliver the route in line with the Active Travel Act Guidance.

The work is expected to last for 12 weeks, with an aim to finish by mid-April 2024. This route will provide links to education settings, such as Overmonnow Primary and Monmouth Comprehensive, and be a pivotal link to the town centre and its facilities. The works will require temporary traffic light controls and have been arranged, taking into account other planned roadworks in the area to minimise impact.

Monmouthshire County Council’s Cabinet Member for Climate Change and the Environment, Cllr Catrin Maby, said: “This is an exciting step in the progress of an Active Travel Route in Monmouth. The widening of footways will provide a safer route for cyclists and walkers as they travel around Monmouth.”

Scheme Information

We would like to provide you with an update on the progress of the Williams Field Lane to Monnow Bridge Active Travel link proposal since the last online public consultation in February 2022.

Why have changes been proposed?

The need for an Active Travel link at this location was first recognised during Monmouthshire Council’s Active Travel Integrated Network Map (INM) submission to the Welsh Government in 2018. The link between the entrance to Williams Field Lane and Monnow Bridge is a relatively short but important link in the wider Active Travel network as it will provide direct access to Monnow Bridge and the services and facilities within the town centre. The route will connect Williams Field Lane to Monmouth town centre via Wonastow Road and Drybridge Street, and also provide connections from Rockfield Road skatepark to the town centre. At the Wonastow Road end, the proposed route would connect to another active travel route running between the Kingswood Gate development and Williams Field Lane.

The new housing development at Kingswood Gate has been one of the key drivers for changes being proposed. Local population growth will inevitably lead to more journeys and pressure on local highway network. This can result in greater congestion, pollution, and further negative impacts on the economy. Walking and cycling have a significant role to play in making transport run more efficiently. Therefore, to enable efficient and sustainable mobility, integrating planning and housing growth with transport planning from the outset has never been more important. The first two phases of the Kingswood to Williams Field Lane route have already been constructed and the proposed scheme would tie into this new route at the Wonastow Road/Williams Field Lane junction.

The study area is shown in Figure 1.

Figure 1: Study Area

Scheme Objectives

  • Provide a coherent, direct, safe, comfortable, and attractive walking and cycling network from Overmonnow to surrounding communities, services, and facilities across Monmouth;
  • Increase levels of sustainable access to employment, health, education, and services;
  • Positively impact actual and perceived pedestrian, cyclist, and wheelchair user’s safety along and across the study area;
  • Achieve a modal shift in Monmouth towards more sustainable forms of transport for all journeys; and
  • Reduce the negative impacts of transport on the natural and built environment.

WelTAG Process

The proposed scheme will seek approval and funding from the Welsh Government’s Active Travel Fund and has therefore been developed in line with the Welsh Transport Appraisal Guidance (WelTAG). The WelTAG process covers the complete lifecycle of a proposed intervention in the transport system from assessment of the problem, consideration of possible solutions and scheme design, through to implementation and project evaluation. WelTAG studies are an essential part of major transport projects in Wales to help decide which are the most appropriate solutions to develop, and important in the support of bids to Welsh Government for funding grants to complete the works. Schemes such as this one are usually progressed over several years from concept through to detailed design and are then dependent on the approval of funding from Welsh Government for the construction phase.

The first dedicated transport appraisal guidance for Wales was published in 2008 and updated in 2017. In 2022 a new draft guidance has been published to reflect Llwybr Newydd, the new Wales transport strategy 2021. WelTAG involves a series of project planning stages that follow the life of a project, programme or policy from early ideas to after it is completed. There are five WelTAG stages, as shown in Figure 2. Stages 1 and 2 of the project have been completed in August 2022, and we are currently at WelTAG Stage 3.

Figure 2: WelTAG Stages

Click here to view the new draft Welsh Transport Appraisal Guidance (not yet adopted)

https://www.gov.wales/welsh-transport-appraisal-guidance-weltag-2022

Click Here to view the Welsh Transport Appraisal Guidance 2017

https://www.gov.wales/sites/default/files/publications/2017-12/welsh-transport-appraisal-guidance.pdf

Scheme Progress to Date

At the start of this project and in line with the WelTAG process the project team developed a wide list of possible solutions, sufficient to be able to decide whether there are any scheme options worth pursuing and to select a short list of options for more detailed consideration. The long list of options was developed based on the outcomes of the first phase of public consultation (which took place between 9th June and 2nd July 2021), engagement with the key stakeholders (MCC’s officers, Councillors, Transport for Wales, groups representing people with disabilities, Sustrans, bus operators, etc.), site visits, brainstorming sessions with the project design team and the need to align with the priorities for transport in Wales set out in the Wales Transport Strategy. The long list of options was agreed with MCC and included nine options. These nine options were then sifted based on:

  • The ability to prevent, or solve the problem now and in the future;
  • The ability to meet the objectives set and improve the social, cultural, environment and economic well-being of Wales;
  • Short- and long-term impacts to deliver multiple benefits across the four aspects of well-being and maximise contribution to all seven well-being goals of Wales;
  • Deliverability; and
  • Robustness to uncertainty and potential to drive long lasting change.

Three options were shortlisted to be taken on to the next Stage 2 of the appraisal process for a more rigorous assessment. A key to the sifting process was the second phase of public consultation, which took place between the 5th of January and 16th February 2022. A total of 133 members of the public responded to the online consultation questionnaire, 41% of which selected the current proposal as their preferred option. 28% selected Option 9 (no improvements, only routine maintenance), 20% chose Option 8&4 (cycle lane on carriageway along Wonastow Road and walking and cycling improvements on Somerset Road and Goldwire Lane) and 11% prefer Option 5 (footway improvements with cycle lane on carriageway along Wonastow Road to Monnow Bridge via the B4233). As a result, Option 2 (detailed below) was recommended as a preferred option at the end of the WelTAG Stage 1&2 study.

Subsequently, MCC commissioned a Stage 3 study and have been undertaking tasks to enable the implementation of the proposal, such as:

  • A traffic survey at the Wonastow Road/Rockfield Road mini-roundabout junction to enable a traffic modelling exercise;
  • Installation of the artificial intelligence sensors to gather anonymous 24/7 data on transport modes, traffic flow and travel patterns within the study area;
  • A 12-hour parking survey undertaken on 11th October 2022 along Wonastow Road;
  • Meetings have been held with the local Councillors regarding the proposed removal of parking in order for the route to be compliant with Active Travel Act Guidance;
  • A letter drop to residents along Wonastow Road to inform them about the proposed removal of car parking spaces;
  • A section of Rockfield Road has been added to the study area in order to improve connection with Monmouth Skatepark and Rockfield Road car park;
  • Preparation for further stakeholder engagement activities (such as stakeholder workshops, and technical meetings); and
  • A more detailed scheme design along with a Road Safety Audit Stage 4 and development of a scheme construction cost estimate.

Proposal

The proposed scheme would provide the following:

  • Widening the existing footway on the northern side of Wonastow Road to accommodate a shared use footway/cycleway 3m-3.5m wide which will be achieved through a slight narrowing down of the carriageway (two lanes for traffic will be maintained);
  • Replacing the existing Wonastow Road/Rockfield Road mini-roundabout with a priority junction, with Wonastow Road becoming a minor arm. This change is intended to discourage heavy traffic from using the aforementioned roads and to encourage them to use the Link Road instead. A modelling exercise was undertaken to ensure that the junction will continue to operate within capacity after it has been converted;
  • Providing  a simple uncontrolled pedestrian crossing on Wonastow Road, immediately west of the new priority junction. The crossing would have dropped kerbs and yellow tactile paving.
  • Providing a parallel crossing on Rockfield Road immediately north of the new priority junction.

Parallel crossing for pedestrians and cyclists provides more demand responsive and a lower cost solution to accommodate cycle and pedestrian crossing movements next to each other, compared to signalised facilities. The crossing is similar to a Zebra crossing, but with a separate cycle crossing indicated by ‘Elephant Footprint’ markings and cycle symbols located between Zebra stripes and give way line.

Example Parallel Crossing – Note: The above image was extracted from the Active Travel Act Guidance
  • Widening the existing footway on the eastern side of Rockfield Road from the new priority junction to Monmouth Skatepark. This will be achieved through a slight narrowing down of the carriageway. Traffic would still be able to use both lanes, and the existing bus stops would be unaffected (only the bus stop boarding platform on the western side of the road will be moved slightly to the north);
  • Adding tactile paving to the uncontrolled crossing on Rockfield Road, at the entrance of the Monmouth Skatepark.
  • To facilitate pedestrians a simple uncontrolled crossing would be provided to the north of the existing bus stops, with dropped kerbs and yellow tactile paving;
  • Widening of a short section of the existing footway along B4233 Drybridge Street near the  Monnow Bridge roundabout;
  • Removing sections of on-street parking along Wonastow Road to deliver the route in line with the Active Travel Act Guidance. To allow this, the scheme proposes permit parking ONLY for a large part along Drybridge Street, while still maintaining a small area for short stay. The exact layout of this parking is yet to be confirmed and will be agreed at the detail design stage. The removal of this on-street parking will be included in MCC’s Traffic Amendment Order No.11, which is due to be consulted on in May 2023.

Click Here to view the Active Travel Guidance.

[https://www.gov.wales/sites/default/files/publications/2022-01/active-travel-act-guidance.pdf

Next Stages

The next stages in the scheme development include:

  • Completion of WelTAG Stage 3 (March 2023)
  • Funding application and approval (April 2023)
  • Construction activity funding dependent and parking Traffic Regulation Order dependent (June-September 2023)
  • Post scheme monitoring (October 2023, October 2024)

Have Your Say

If you would like to provide any comments with regards to the scheme proposal, please submit this form.

By completing this survey, you are agreeing for this data to be used for this purpose by Monmouthshire County Council and by WSP (RE&I).

Your personal information will be processed by Monmouthshire County Council on behalf of WSP (RE&I). We will only collect your data for this purpose and any sharing of data will be anonymised. This form does not capture your name or contact details. For more information about privacy visit 

https://www.monmouthshire.gov.uk/your-privacy/

By submitting this form, you are consenting to your information being processed for the purpose as outlined above.


Milestone reached in Active Travel bridge for the Wye at Monmouth

Images: Artist’s impression of a possible design for the proposed Active Travel bridge across the Wye at Monmouth

Proposals for a new Active Travel crossing of the river Wye at Monmouth have taken a major step forward. The proposed design for a bridge for pedestrian and cyclists has now been submitted for planning. The project, which is supported by the Welsh Government’s Active Travel Fund, aims to create a new safe route linking Monmouth and Wyesham that avoids the vehicular traffic on the busy Wye Bridge. It is to be noted that the existing Wye Bridge pavement will remain if the new bridge is constructed.

‘Active Travel’ describes journeys with a purpose, such as to and from school or a place of work, undertaken by foot or by bicycle. The current Wye road bridge (A466) is not suitable for Active Travel purposes and a separate car-free crossing has been developed by Monmouthshire County Council in partnership with Welsh Government, Transport For Wales, Sustrans, WSP, Monmouth Town Council, Natural Resources Wales and Haberdashers Schools.

The plans can be viewed, and comments made, on the planning website at https://planningonline.monmouthshire.gov.uk/online-applications/ entering application reference DM/2022/01800.  Public access computers are available at Monmouth library if required.

Cllr. Sara Burch, Monmouthshire County Council’s Cabinet Member for Active Travel, said: “I’m delighted that we are moving towards making this project a reality. The new bridge will make a big difference to the people of Monmouth and Wyesham and visitors to our county.  It will make it easier to walk or cycle to work in town and for children and young people to go to school. Completing this project is a priority as part of our Active Travel plans and I look forward to being able to update residents further in due course. So many people have said that they did not feel safe walking or cycling across the existing bridge that it’s right to make it a priority.”

Cllr. Catrin Maby, Cabinet Member for Climate Change and the Environment, added: “Supporting Active Travel is a vital part of our work to tackle the climate emergency. This new bridge will enable more people to leave the car at home and travel by foot or by bike away from traffic; making commuting easier, more enjoyable and more environmentally friendly.”

The bridge forms part of a comprehensive suite of Active Travel plans for the town, with improvements proposed linking Wyesham to the new bridge and from the new bridge to the Kingswood Gate development. Subject to securing planning permission and funding, Monmouthshire County Council expects to construct the bridge in 2024/5.

For more information about Active Travel in Monmouthshire visit www.monlife.co.uk/outdoor/active-travel.


Wyesham Public Consultation

PUBLIC CONSULTATION: Wyesham Active Travel Links (Monmouth) WelTAG Stage Two Study

Have your say

We would like to hear your views on the list of potential options designed to improve active travel links between the proposed new Active Travel Bridge across the River Wye and Wyesham.

We recommend you view the plans via the options below and read this page to find out more about the scheme.

Section 1:

Option 1

Option 2

Why have changes been proposed?

The route from Wyesham into Monmouth town centre is heavily utilised by residents, children (traveling to and from schools), tourists and visitors. The existing pedestrian facilities are however limited, whilst there are no cycling facilities at all. Links within the study area have failed the active travel audits carried out by Monmouthshire County Council in September 2020. As proposals for the Wye Active Travel Bridge have emerged, the importance of connecting active travel links from the surrounding areas to and from the new bridge has been highlighted.

Scheme Objectives

The objectives of this scheme are to:

  • Provide a direct, coherent, comfortable and attractive walking and cycling network suitable for all users;
  • Increase levels of sustainable access to education, employment health and other key services;
  • Improve actual and perceived safety of vulnerable users;
  • Increase the number of people walking and cycling between Wyesham and Monmouth town centre;
  • Reduce car dependency and car use for short trips between Wyesham and Monmouth town centre through a modal shift; and
  • Reduce the negative impacts of transport on the natural and built environment (i.e., improve air quality, improve public realm, provide sustainable drainage infrastructure, etc.)

The Proposals

Projects such as this one are usually progressed over several years from concept through to detailed design and are then dependent on the approval of funding from bodies such as Welsh Government for the construction phase. We are currently at an early stage of the design process. The preferred option will be selected based on several aspects, including public consultation results, option deliverability (where land ownership will play a key part), cost implications, and option performance against national, regional and local objectives, ambitions and priorities.

Due to the size of the study area, the route has been split into two sections, as described below.

Route Section One – from Proposed New Active Travel Bridge to Wyesham Road

Option 1: proposes to widen the existing footway on the northern side of the A466 and A4136 to provide an off-road shared footway/cycleway from the Active Travel Bridge to Wyesham Road achieved through slight narrowing down of the carriageway and structural support of embankment. The two existing uncontrolled pedestrian refuge island crossings would be replaced with controlled crossing facilities. All side road junctions would be re-designed to accommodate an active travel route.

Option 2: as Option 1 but partially below the existing road level (between Riverside Park and Redbrook Road). A shared pedestrian/cycle route would commence from the junction with Riverside Park and run below the existing road level of the A466. A ramp would then connect it to the existing footway (bring up to the footway level) opposite the junction with Redbrook Road. The existing footway on the southern side of the A466 would remain unaffected.

Route Section Two – Wyesham Road and Wyesham Avenue

Option 1: one-way system eastbound Wyesham Road (In) / Wyesham Avenue (Out), after junction with Wyesham Avenue, the carriageway would revert to two-way traffic. A shared footway/cycleway would be provided on southern side of Wyesham Road to Kymin View Primary School. The carriageway width on Wyesham Avenue would be reduced and footway widened. No loss of parking on Wyesham Avenue. Potential to include links from Wyesham Avenue to Wyesham Road behind St James’s Church and through community woodland.

Option 2: same as Option 1 but westbound Wyesham Avenue (In) / Wyesham Road (Out)

Option 3: maintain two-way traffic throughout with quiet streets principle applied to Wyesham Road and Wyesham Avenue. ‘Quiet streets’ is a term given to urban cycling routes on low traffic speed and volume back streets, which are particularly suitable for new and less confident cyclists. Wyesham Road and Wyesham Avenue have been earmarked for a 20mph speed limit, which will suit the quiet streets principle. A cycle route would be provided on-road with traffic, with cycle symbols used to sign the route and indicate the correct positioning for cycling within the carriageway. Footways would be widened where possible for pedestrian use only. A consideration will be given to include links from Wyesham Avenue to Wyesham Road behind St James’s Church and through community woodland. There is also a potential to include a short length of Shared Use (Pedestrian and Cycleway) Footway from the Wyesham Road junction with Wyesham Avenue to Kymin View School.

Quiet Streets – DE205: CLICK HERE

Option sifting

At the start of this project and in line with the Welsh Transport Appraisal Process the project team developed a wide list of possible solutions, sufficient to be able to decide whether there are any scheme options worth pursuing and to select a short list of options (as detailed above) for more detailed consideration. Options were shortlisted based on:

  • their ability to prevent, or solve the problem now and in the future;
  • their ability to meet the objectives set and improve the social, cultural, environmental and economic well-being of Wales;
  • their short- and longer-term impacts to deliver multiple benefits across the four aspects of well-being and maximise contribution to all seven well-being goals;
  • their deliverability; and
  • their robustness to uncertainty and potential to drive long lasting change.

The Wyesham Road/Avenue route is currently the priority to link Wyesham to Monmouth town and is required to be designed and built to accompany the new Active Travel Bridge. Unfortunately, all options to improve the Redbrook Road route require land purchase and substantial retaining structures, which could take years to agree. This could significantly delay and even jeopardize the scheme. As such, the Redbrook Road section has been excluded from this scheme and our current focus in on the Wyesham Road/Avenue route, which will support delivery of the new Active Travel Bridge.

Your opinion

We want to hear your opinions on each of these shortlisted options. You can express your thoughts by clicking on the survey link below.

Please encourage members of your household and others to undertake the survey since your responses may not necessarily reflect the views of others.

By completing this survey, you are agreeing for this data to be used for this purpose by Monmouthshire County Council and by WSP (RE&I).

Your personal information will be processed by Monmouthshire County Council on behalf of WSP (RE&I). We will only collect your data for this purpose and any sharing of data will be anonymised. This form does not capture your name or contact details. For more information about privacy visit https://www.monmouthshire.gov.uk/your-privacy/

By submitting this form, you are consenting to your information being processed for the purpose as outlined above.